Kim GregoryComment

Feel great around the clock

Kim GregoryComment
Feel great around the clock

MORNING

Brush your teeth

To achieve the whitest smile, brush your teeth as soon as you wake up as this gets rid of the bacteria which forms in the mouth overnight. 

According to research by Colgate, brushing too soon after breakfast could weaken your tooth enamel and cause erosion to your teeth. However, if you eat particularly acidic food, such as oranges, grapefruits or lemons, then you should drink a glass of water when you are finished to wash away the acids and keep acid erosion to a minimum.

Moisturise Consultant dermatologist Dr Sharon Wong recommends applying moisturiser first thing in the morning as skin is at its driest at this time. 

She also advises including a high-factor sunblock in your skincare routine, warning that the best way to prevent skin damage is to protect yourself from excessive sun exposure. 

Besides increasing your risk of skin cancer, being exposed to too much UV radiation ages your skin.

She explains: ‘Topical antioxidants such as vitamin C serums can provide additional protection against environment stressors such as pollution and UV damage.’

Have a healthy breakfast

If you’re aiming for a more youthful look, don’t go for sugary cereals or a bacon sandwich to keep you nourished. Dr Wong recommends reducing the amount of sugary and processed food that you eat. 

She says: ‘There is now good evidence to support the view that a diet high in refined sugars and processed foods has a detrimental effect on your skin and can accelerate the ageing process.’

MIDDAY

Drink water

To keep your skin and insides healthy, the NHS recommends drinking six to eight glasses of fluid throughout the day, including water, lower-fat milk and sugar-free drinks. 

Blot your skin If you suffer from particularly oily or shiny skin, it will be worst around midday. The skin produces the most sebum during the middle of the day to protect against UV rays, so this would be the best time to use blotting papers to remove excess oil and help keep skin clear. 

Avoid smoking

To keep your skin and body in the best condition, Dr Wong also advises staying away from cigarettes. 

She says: ‘Smoking creates free radicals in the body which cause direct damage to collagen and elastin in the skin.’

Not only do these molecules dry out skin, they also make you look older by making it harder for skin to heal itself.

AFTER WORK

Have a massage Avoid having a massage in the morning, as this can make you feel weary and sluggish. After work and before dinner is the ideal time, as you won’t be full and uncomfortable and it will soothe away the cares of the day and set you up for a good night’s sleep. 

Have a facial

The best time to have a facial is after work or in the evenings. Because the treatment opens up the pores of your face, making your skin vulnerable to picking up extra oil and pollutants, having it earlier in the day could leave it in a worse condition than before. Having the treatment later on also allows any oils or serums used on your skin to sink in more deeply overnight.

EVENING

Shave your legs

Using a razor at night instead of first thing will leave you with smoother skin. Throughout the day the skin on your legs tightens, leaving irritating hairs sticking out further and making it easier to get a closer shave. In the morning legs are more swollen and hair is harder to reach.

BEDTIME

Apply face creams

If you use topical retinoids for a skin condition like acne, Dr Wong recommends applying them at night because they can make your skin more sun sensitive. 

And before you settle off to sleep, you should moisturise to minimise how much your skin dries out. This is because the amount of water which passes out through our skin increases towards the end of the day when the barrier function of the skin is least effective. 

Dr Wong explains: ‘It is commonly believed that the skin repairs itself at night but there is no scientific evidence to support that.’ 

So it makes sense to give your skin a little extra help before you go to bed.

Edited by Alexandra Grainger